‘Insulin is our oxygen’: Bernie Sanders rides another campaign bus to Canada

Accompanying Americans seeking affordable medicine, the Democratic candidate lambasted US pharmaceutical giants When Hunter Sego realized the insulin he needed to manage his type 1 diabetes cost more than $1,400, he called his mother in a panic. His family had insurance. He did not believe it was possible a one-month supply of life-saving medication could cost so much. The price tag was correct. Sego, then a student and football player at DePauw University, began to ration his insulin, using a quarter of what had been prescribed. He lost weight. His grades dropped. He struggled on the field. Fortunately, his mother found out and stopped him from rationing his insulin a practice that is one in four American diabetics ration their …